Frequent question: Should I tell my kids their grandma has cancer?

How do you tell a child their grandparent has cancer?

Offer information at the child’s developmental level. Use the word cancer, instead of just saying that the person with cancer is sick, to help children distinguish between this illness and others he or she may encounter. Discuss feelings and emotions as much as you discuss the facts about cancer.

Should I tell my 8 year old I have cancer?

The child’s age is important in deciding what and how much you should tell about a cancer diagnosis. The guiding principle should be to tell the truth in a way that children are able to understand and prepare themselves for the changes that will happen in the family. Kids thrive on routine—it helps them feel safe.

What to say to kids whose mom has cancer?

We recommend using the 5 C’s when talking to kids about cancer:

  • Say that it’s cancer.
  • Tell your kids, “You didn’t cause it. You can’t catch it. You can’t control it.”
  • Also, tell your kids that you can still spend quality time together, participate in care, still be a kid, have fun, etc.
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Should I tell my child they have cancer?

Many parents think they can protect their child by not telling him or her about the cancer. But it is important to name your child’s medical condition as “cancer.” Parents should also further describe it since your child will hear this language from others.

How do you tell a child their grandparent is dying?

How can I tell them and what should I say?

  1. Ask someone else to be there:
  2. Use language they can understand:
  3. Go at their pace:
  4. Try not to look uncomfortable:
  5. Don’t worry if you become upset:
  6. Tell them they can’t change what’s happening:
  7. Check what they know and understand:
  8. Encourage your child to ask questions:

How do you tell a child their grandparent has died?

Here are some other things that may help.

  1. Be honest. Children need to know what happened to the person that died. …
  2. Use plain language. It is clearer to say someone has died than to use euphemisms. …
  3. Encourage questions. …
  4. Reassure them. …
  5. Ask them to tell their story. …
  6. Worries you might have.

How do you explain cancer to an 8 year old?

How Do You Explain Cancer to Children?

  1. Explain the diagnosis in terms they can understand. …
  2. If you need help finding the right words, seek advice from your doctors and care team. …
  3. Keep them informed. …
  4. When explaining a cancer diagnosis, be truthful. …
  5. Answer their questions and provide comfort.

Can you hide cancer?

Doctors don’t hide cancer from their patients, as they did with Bette Davis in the 1939 film “Dark Victory.” But sometimes, patients feel compelled to keep all or a part of their diagnosis to themselves.

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How do you cheer up someone with cancer?

Although each person with cancer is different, here are some general suggestions for showing support:

  1. Ask permission. Before visiting, giving advice, and asking questions, ask if it is welcome. …
  2. Make plans. …
  3. Be flexible. …
  4. Laugh together. …
  5. Allow for sadness. …
  6. Check in. …
  7. Offer to help. …
  8. Follow through.

How do you explain cancer to a 6 year old?

Prepare a script or write down talking points. Use simple language so your child can easily understand what they are hearing. Include words he or she will overhear like “cancer,” “chemo,” “treatment,” and “radiation.” Describe these words simply and truthfully. Talk about emotions you both may feel.

How do you tell a child that they are dying?

Sometimes, it can help to give your child “permission” to talk about dying, simply by saying – “I’m ok to talk about this if you want to. I’m here for you”. If they find it easier to talk to someone outside the family, the palliative care team could help.

How do parents cope with cancer diagnosis?

My 10 tips for coping when a parent has cancer

  1. Don’t be afraid to say how you feel. …
  2. Recognise that things may change. …
  3. Being there is the most important thing. …
  4. Ask for what you need. …
  5. It’s OK to feel down or confused. …
  6. You don’t have to tell everyone what’s going on. …
  7. Plan nice events together. …
  8. Speak to your employer.