Quick Answer: What is the best way to screen for cervical cancer?

Is there another way to screen for cervical cancer?

There are two types of tests: the Pap test and the HPV test. For both, the doctor or nurse collects cells from the surface of the cervix. With the Pap test, the lab checks the sample for cancer cells or abnormal cells that could become cancer later. With the HPV test, the lab checks for HPV infection.

What is the current recommendation for cervical cancer screening?

ACS recommends cervical cancer screening with an HPV test alone every 5 years for everyone with a cervix from age 25 until age 65. If HPV testing alone is not available, people can get screened with an HPV/Pap cotest every 5 years or a Pap test every 3 years.

When should you start getting screened for cervical cancer?

Cervical cancer testing (screening) should begin at age 25. Those aged 25 to 65 should have a primary HPV test* every 5 years.

How can you test for cervical cancer at home?

Women will be provided an at-home HPV screening kit that includes a tiny brush to swab the vagina to collect cells and a specimen container to mail the swab back to the testing facility. The study, which will be run by the NCI, will assess if the at-home test is comparable to a screening performed in a doctor’s office.

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What was your first cervical cancer symptom?

Early-stage cervical cancer generally produces no signs or symptoms. Signs and symptoms of more-advanced cervical cancer include: Vaginal bleeding after intercourse, between periods or after menopause. Watery, bloody vaginal discharge that may be heavy and have a foul odor.

What can be mistaken for cervical cancer?

One situation sometimes seen by clinicians performing pelvic exams for abnormal bleeding that can be confused with cervical cancer is a prolapsed uterine fibroid. In this situation a large mass is seen on pelvic exam coming from the cervix. Again a biopsy if the diagnosis is uncertain will provide clarity.

Can a gynecologist see cervical cancer?

Cervical cancer may also be suspected if you have symptoms like abnormal vaginal bleeding or pain during sex. Your primary doctor or gynecologist often can do the tests needed to diagnose pre-cancers and cancers and may also be able to treat a pre-cancer.