Should situ carcinoma be treated?

Should situ carcinoma be left untreated?

If DCIS is left untreated, it can go on to become an invasive cancer, so it is often called a pre-cancer.

Is it necessary to treat DCIS?

DCIS is non-invasive and remains within the breast duct, so there is no need to treat cancer cells that might have traveled to other areas of the body. Each individual situation is different. You and your doctor will decide what treatment is best for your situation.

What is the recommended treatment for carcinoma in situ?

Local treatment for DCIS usually involves breast-conserving therapy (BCT), which consists of lumpectomy (also called wide excision or partial mastectomy) followed in most cases by adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Alternatively, mastectomy may be considered.

Is carcinoma in situ considered cancer?

Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is a group of abnormal cells that are found only in the place where they first formed in the body (see left panel). These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread to nearby normal tissue (see right panel).

What are the chances of DCIS coming back?

When you have had DCIS, you are at higher risk for the cancer coming back or for developing a new breast cancer than a person who has never had breast cancer before. Most recurrences happen within the 5 to 10 years after initial diagnosis. The chances of a recurrence are under 30%.

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Does DCIS ever go away?

Clusters of abnormal cells like D.C.I.S. can sometimes disappear, stop growing or simply remain in place and never cause a problem. The suspicion is that the abnormal cells may be harmless and may not require treatment.

How many radiation treatments are needed for DCIS?

A typical course of radiation treatment for DCIS involves 16 sessions given over three weeks.

Why did I get DCIS?

DCIS forms when genetic mutations occur in the DNA of breast duct cells. The genetic mutations cause the cells to appear abnormal, but the cells don’t yet have the ability to break out of the breast duct. Researchers don’t know exactly what triggers the abnormal cell growth that leads to DCIS.

How serious is carcinoma in situ?

These in situ cells are not cancer, but they could become malignant. If they do this, they can start to invade other tissues. For this reason, a doctor will recommend treatment to remove the cells. This will reduce the risk of cancer developing later.

What stage is carcinoma in situ?

In general, carcinoma in situ is the earliest form of cancer, and is considered stage 0. An example of carcinoma in situ is ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS, which is considered an early form of breast cancer and occurs when abnormal cells form a breast’s milk duct.

What are the symptoms of carcinoma in situ?

When ductal carcinoma in situ does produce symptoms, the most common include:

  • Breast pain.
  • Bloody discharge from the nipple.
  • A palpable lump in the breast tissue.
  • A red, scaly rash known as Paget’s disease of the breast.
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