What is the difference between ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive ductal carcinoma?

What is the difference between invasive and in situ breast cancer?

In situ vs.

In situ breast cancer (ductal carcinoma in situ or DCIS) is a cancer that starts in a milk duct and has not grown into the rest of the breast tissue. The term invasive (or infiltrating) breast cancer is used to describe any type of breast cancer that has spread (invaded) into the surrounding breast tissue.

Is ductal carcinoma in situ really cancer?

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) means the cells that line the milk ducts of the breast have become cancer, but they have not spread into surrounding breast tissue. DCIS is considered non-invasive or pre-invasive breast cancer.

How is ductal carcinoma different from in situ?

Ductal means that the cancer starts inside the milk ducts, carcinoma refers to any cancer that begins in the skin or other tissues (including breast tissue) that cover or line the internal organs, and in situ means “in its original place.” DCIS is called “non-invasive” because it hasn’t spread beyond the milk duct into …

What is the survival rate for invasive ductal carcinoma?

What Is Invasive Ductal Carcinoma? Invasive ductal carcinoma describes the type of tumor in about 80 percent of people with breast cancer. The five-year survival rate is quite high — almost 100 percent when the tumor is caught and treated early.

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What are the symptoms of invasive ductal carcinoma?

What are the symptoms of invasive ductal carcinoma?

  • Lump in the breast.
  • Thickening of the breast skin.
  • Rash or redness of the breast.
  • Swelling in one breast.
  • New pain in one particular location of a breast.
  • Dimpling around the nipple or on the breast skin.
  • Nipple pain or the nipple turning inward.
  • Nipple discharge.

Should I have a mastectomy for DCIS?

Mastectomy involves removal of the whole breast and is usually recommended if the DCIS affects a large area of the breast, if it has not been possible to get a clear area of normal tissue around the DCIS by wide local excision, or if there is more than one area of DCIS.

Can ductal carcinoma in situ return?

Patients who experience a ductal carcinoma in situ recurrence typically do so within 10 years of receiving their original diagnosis.