What two tests can be used to confirm testicular cancer?

What kind of test do they do for testicular cancer?

An ultrasound is often the first test done if the doctor thinks you might have testicular cancer. It uses sound waves to produce images of the inside of your body. It can be used to see if a change is a certain benign condition (like a hydrocele or varicocele) or a solid tumor that could be a cancer.

Does a CT scan show testicular cancer?

A CT scan can check if testicular cancer has spread to any lymph nodes in the tummy (abdomen) or chest area. A CT scan is a test that uses x-rays and a computer to create detailed pictures of the inside of your body.

What are the 2 most common signs of testicular cancer?

Signs and symptoms of testicular cancer include:

  • A lump or enlargement in either testicle.
  • A feeling of heaviness in the scrotum.
  • A dull ache in the abdomen or groin.
  • A sudden collection of fluid in the scrotum.
  • Pain or discomfort in a testicle or the scrotum.
  • Enlargement or tenderness of the breasts.
  • Back pain.
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Which of the following is the only definitive way to diagnose testicular cancer?

The only way to be sure of the diagnosis is to surgically remove the affected testicle (orchidectomy) and examine it in a laboratory. In most cases only one testicle needs to be removed.

Does testicular cancer spread quickly?

Seminomas tend to grow and spread more slowly than nonseminomas, which are more common, accounting for roughly 60 percent of all testicular cancers. How quickly a cancer spreads will vary from patient to patient.

Can urine test detect testicular cancer?

Lab Tests. Some blood and urine tests can be used to help diagnose testicular cancer. Many testicular cancers produce a protein known as a tumor marker. If tumor markers are found in the blood, it could mean that you have developed testicular cancer.

How long can testicular cancer go untreated?

5 years is a common time point to measure survival. But some people live much longer than this. 5 year survival is the number of people who have not died from their cancer within 5 years after diagnosis.

What can be mistaken for testicular cancer?

More common than testicular cancer is epididymitis, which is inflammation of the epididymis, a tubular structure next to the testicle where sperm mature. About 600,000 men get it each year, most commonly between ages 19 and 35.

What are the 5 warning signs of testicular cancer?

Five Common Signs of Testicular Cancer

  • A painless lump, swelling or enlargement of one or both testes.
  • Pain or heaviness in the scrotum.
  • A dull ache or pressure in the groin, abdomen or low back.
  • A general feeling of malaise, including unexplained fatigue, fever, sweating, coughing, shortness of breath or mild chest pains.
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Can late stage testicular cancer be cured?

Some types of recurring testicular cancer have a cure rate of over 95%. Recurrences that happen after previous combination chemotherapy can also be cured, but the chances of this will vary between individuals and you’ll need to ask your doctors to discuss this with you.

What does a testicular cyst feel like?

A spermatocele (epididymal cyst) is a painless, fluid-filled cyst in the long, tightly coiled tube that lies above and behind each testicle (epididymis). The fluid in the cyst may contain sperm that are no longer alive. It feels like a smooth, firm lump in the scrotum on top of the testicle.

Does testicular cancer show up in blood tests?

To help confirm a diagnosis, you may need a series of blood tests to detect certain hormones in your blood, known as markers. Testicular cancer often produces these markers, so it may indicate you have the condition if they’re in your blood. Markers in your blood that’ll be tested for include: alpha feto-protein (AFP)

What level of hCG indicates cancer?

Generally speaking, any level above normal may indicate cancer. Often it’s not hard to tell, since hCG levels can skyrocket to 300-10,000 mIU/mL in some types of cancer [3, 4]. If your hCG or β-hCG levels are high, your doctor may pursue more aggressive or longer treatment options [3, 4].