What’s the worst type of breast cancer?

Which is the most aggressive form of breast cancer?

Metastatic Breast Cancer

The most serious and dangerous breast cancers – wherever they arise or whatever their type – are metastatic cancers. Metastasis means that the cancer has spread from the place where it started into other tissues distant from the original tumor site.

What are the 4 types of breast cancer?

Types of breast cancer include ductal carcinoma in situ, invasive ductal carcinoma, inflammatory breast cancer, and metastatic breast cancer.

Which type of breast cancer has the best prognosis?

Pure mucinous ductal carcinoma carries a better prognosis than more common types of IDCs. Papillary Carcinoma – This is a very good prognosis breast cancer that primarily occur in women over the age of 60.

What type of breast cancer is the most difficult to treat?

Triple-negative breast cancer is that which tests negative for three receptors: estrogen, progesterone, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). It is also the least common form of breast cancer and the hardest to treat.

What is the easiest breast cancer to treat?

Invasive breast cancers are staged I through IV, with stage I being the earliest stage and easiest to treat, while stages II and III represent advancing cancer, with stage IV representing breast cancer cells that have spread (metastasized) to distant organs like the bones, lungs, or brain.

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What is the fastest growing breast cancer?

Inflammatory breast cancer, which may be detected in the ducts or lobules, tends to spread faster than other types of breast cancer. This quick-growing, aggressive disease makes up about 1 to 5 percent of breast cancers in the United States, according to the NCI.

Can you live 20 years with metastatic breast cancer?

While there is no cure for metastatic breast cancer, there are treatments that slow the cancer, extending the patient’s life while also improving the quality of life, Henry says. Many patients now live 10 years or more after a metastatic diagnosis.

Can you live 20 years after breast cancer?

Since the hazard rate associated with inflammatory breast cancer shows a sharp peak within the first 2 years and a rapid reduction in risk in subsequent years, it is highly likely that the great majority of patients alive 20 years after diagnosis are cured.